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MINOTAUR. HANDMADE SILVER PENDANT WITH RED STRING

45,00 

Product details:

Dimensions: 1.7 cm x 2.2 cm X 0.8 mm
Color: Shiny silver
Tying: Adjustable cord 80 cm
String color: Red
Clasp: Stopper bead
Symbol: Minotaur

 

All My Myth jewelry is delivered in a handmade fabric case for easy transport and safe
storage. Inside the case is placed information leaflet about the Minotaur and its symbolism!

 

Our handmade My Myth jewelry is always accompanied by the
distinctive My Myth signature and comes elegantly packaged for gifting.

 

 

Greek product.

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SKU: 925.PD.UN.SI.X.05.MI04

SKU: 925.PD.UN.SI.X.02.MI04 Category:
				
				
	

Description

Minotaur’s handmade red pendant

Minotaur's symbol handmade pendant

Minotaur’s handmade red pendant. The most famous labyrinth is in Greek mythology in the story of Theseus, the prince of Athens.

Daedalus designed this labyrinth for King Minos of Knossos on Crete to confine the ferocious Minotaur, a half-man/half-bull creature. Minos prayed to Poseidon for a snow-white bull as a symbol of the god’s blessing on his cause.

Poseidon, enraged by this ingratitude, caused Minos’ wife Pasiphae to fall in love with the bull and mate with it. The creature she gave birth to was the Minotaur which fed on human flesh and could not be controlled. Minos then had the architect Daedalus create a labyrinth that would hold the monster.

In another famous tale from Greek mythology, Daedalus and Icarus escape their prison. They used the feathers of birds bound together by wax to form wings with which they fly from the tower. Icarus flew too close to the sun, melting the wax of his wings, and fell into the sea.

Theseus, son of King Aegeus, vowed to put an end to his people’s suffering.

He told his father that, should he be successful, he would change the sails to white on the trip home.

Once on Crete, Theseus attracted the attention of Mino’s daughter Ariadne who fell in love with him and secretly gave him a sword and a ball of twine. She told him to attach the thread after he had killed the Minotaur, he would then be able to follow it back to freedom.

Theseus kills the monster, saves the youths who are sent with him, and escapes from Crete with Ariadne but abandons her on the island of Naxos. In his haste to reach Athens afterward, he forgets to change the sails on the tribute ship from black to white and Aegeus, seeing the black sails returning, flings himself into the sea and dies; Theseus then succeeds him.

Minotaur’s  handmade red pendant

My myth

				
				

The Minotaur was a mythical creature of the Minoan civilization. When Minos was contending for the kingship against his brothers, he asked for a sign of fa

MINOTAUR

The Minotaur was a mythical creature of the Minoan civilization. When Minos was contending for the kingship against his brothers, he asked for a sign of favor from the gods. He received a white bull intended for sacrifice to the god Poseidon. However, Minos chose to sacrifice a different bull. In response to this insult, Poseidon caused Minos’ wife, Pasiphae, to fall in love with the bull and mate with it. As a result, she gave birth to the Minotaur, a creature that consumed human flesh and proved uncontrollable. King Minos confined it within the labyrinth of Knossos.

The Minotaur symbolizes the consequences of unchecked power and the triumph of courage over monstrous adversity. It represents the complexity of the human 

SIMBOLISM

The Minotaur symbolizes the consequences of unchecked power and the triumph of courage over monstrous adversity. It represents the complexity of the human psyche, embodying the intricate labyrinth of our subconscious where hidden fears and desires reside. The creature, part bull, and part man mirrors the duality within us. The bull-headed figure embodies primal instincts and untamed impulses, reflecting the struggle to confront and master one’s inner demons. As a symbol of self-discovery and overcoming inner conflicts, the Minotaur serves as a timeless metaphor for navigating the intricate passages of the human soul.

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